BUSINESS LAW SECTION INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW SECTION Visit the KERR & NADEAU Library



Corporate Law Services | << Back to BUSINESS LAW SERVICES

  • Incorporations, Partnerships, Sole Proprietorships
  • Corporate Governance & Management
  • Directors & Officers Duties & Liabilities
  • Shareholder Agreements, Rights and Disputes
  • Oppression Remedy Actions

You cannot practice business law effectively unless you possess certain characteristics. Although a thorough knowledge of the law is the sine qua non of commercial practice, it alone is woefully inadequate.

The effective commercial lawyer must also have the soul of an entrepreneur, the wisdom of Solomon and the writing skills of a playwright. He or she must be able quickly to appreciate the nuances of the client’s business model, the perils and promises of the industry and the regulatory and tax implications of the client’s objectives. Perhaps most important, he or she must have a nose for trouble, whether past, present or future and an instinct for how trouble can be remedied and avoided. But while the best business lawyers, like the best hockey players, start with natural talent and are driven by a love of the game, it is experience which makes them excellent.

Like the best hockey players, the best commercial lawyers are consummate team players. It is generally the commercial lawyer who “sets up the play” and thus needs to have a reflexive sense of where each of his team members is “on the ice” and what each team member can and must do to score the goal. Thus, the business lawyer must be able to work seamlessly with tax experts, IP specialists, environmentalists, actuaries, engineers, land use planners, foresters, oceanographers...... in other words, with anyone whose professional input is critical to a successful outcome for the client.

Ethics- who cares? We do, and so does the market. Ethical behavior lets you sleep at night, but it can also go to long-term business success. See our article “Ethics & the Integrity Advantage: Business & Legal Ethics in the Post-Enron Era