Copyright

Copyright subsists automatically in any original literary, artistic, dramatic or musical work,   created by the author, writer, performer or creator. It includes computer programs, sound recordings and performer’s rights.

Copyright is the exclusive right to produce, reproduce, publish or perform your original literary, artistic, dramatic and musical creations. If the work is unpublished, copyright includes the right to publish the work or any substantial part of it.

Copyright is the exclusive right to produce, reproduce, publish or perform your original literary, artistic, dramatic and musical creations. If the work is unpublished, copyright includes the right to publish the work or any substantial part of it.

The creator is usually the copyright owner. However, an employer may acquire copyright in works created by employees in the course of their employment under specific defined conditions, unless there is an agreement in place stating otherwise.

Generally, an original work is automatically protected by copyright the moment you create it. By registering your copyright, you receive a certificate issued by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office that can be used in court as evidence that you own it.

Your copyright exists in Canada during your lifetime and for 50 years following your death. After that, the work is in the public domain, and anyone can use it. This is true for most works, but there are exceptions.

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